Lo-Fi Culture Presents: Linanthem!

Welcome back Lo-Fi listeners! 🙂

This week’s feature is special as it includes a mid-decemeber present by Linathem called  the “Enlightened EP”.  Linathem had his start in lo-fi in 2016 where he grew fond of the lo-fi music scene.  Fast forward to today, he’s garnered up over half-a-million monthly listeners on Spotify and has been featured on many Youtube channels like Yotsu, Black Lotus, and Ryuzy Music where many chill vibes like Linanthem can be found. He’s been around the scene and has worked with many great lo-fi producers like bsd.u, sleepdealer, and many more!
I invite all of our readers to give his music a play while learning about his background, some music production tips, and his general opinion on lo-fi production.

Linanthem Soundcloud (our private playlist)

 

LINANTHEM
linanthem random photo
Found on Linanthem’s Twitter

BEGINNING OF INTERVIEW

“…

What is your name? Would you like to share your ethnicity?

My names is Esaias, it’s kind of an unusual name, as far as I know its Greek for Isaiah. As for my ethnicity, i’m pretty much black and a little bit of white.

What is the back story behind the name “Linanthem”? 

I get asked a lot about the name I choose and where it comes from, but there’s no grand story behind it unfortunately. I was watching an episode of Regular Show where [the character] “Rigby” was coming up with his artist name and put the first two things he saw together and that was his name. My first two words were lint from my pocket and “Gotham City” from Batman. I just rearranged it to Linanthem.

How long have you been doing music as Linanthem? 

I started Linanthem during the summer of 2016. Before then I was still around in the scene, I just wasn’t actively making lo-fi. I was making music under a different name before then, but i was really inspired to start making lo-fi beats because of how unique the music was and how the producers involved were constantly pushing boundaries and were just doing their own thing.

What is your daily schedule like? How does lo-fi hip hop fit into your schedule?

As far as my daily schedule, I’m in college right now, but I still devote a large amount of my time to my productions. As soon as I’m done with class, I’ll usually go digging for samples, finish up beats or start new ones. It’s like that almost everyday.

 

 

What’s your favorite thing about the Lo-Fi hip hop genre? 

My favorite aspect about lo-fi is the community around it, it’s unlike anything else in music. Everyone pretty much knows everyone and we’re all like-minded individuals. Most days i find myself talking to them more than anyone in my real life.

What got you started into Lo-Fi HipHop? 

I got introduced to lo-fi through a group called the coast crew, they’re all well-known artist like datfootdive, [ocean jams], and a couple other members. I found them because they were really connected to future funk and vaporwave which was the type of music I made prior to devoting my effort to lo-fi.

How did you grow your audience to what it is today? Do you have any advice for future/current artists in lo-fi?

There’s no such thing as a self-made person. I’m not going to take full credit for what I have now, even though I’m not the biggest lo-fi artist, I’m thankful for what I have. It was a joint effort between every person I’ve met and connected with through music. I’m very thankful I’ve gotten to work with people who I look up to a lot and even be able to call them a friend. My advice would be to connect with people and create bonds with them.

What do you think about the future of Lo-Fi? How will you transform with it?

Right now I see the lo-fi scene as the wild west in music right now, kind of an anything goes attitude, my hope is that it will always be like this, but that’s naive to think. The trend at least for now is soft repetitive music perfect for Youtube streams and Spotify playlist. Instead of pushing boundaries, a lot of producers are becoming complacent, trying to get a large audience over becoming a unique artist. For me I’ve always had a unique take on lo-fi, I like music that can tell a story without uttering a word. That’s my goal for every beat I release, in addition to collage artwork, I try to deliver an experience with every beat.

Do you feel like experimenting with other fields of lo-fi music? 

I do experiment a lot, that’s what making music is all about. I make electronic beats for fun sometimes although they don’t get released, but for my upcoming project, I took everything I learned from making electronic and integrated it with some really chill lo-fi I’m excited to release it.

 

 

 

Do you have tips or tricks on finishing beats?

You can’t rush the process, if it’s not meant to be, then it’s not meant to be. A lot of my projects can go unfinished from a couple [of] days to over a year. I usually just work until I feel like I’ve hit a roadblock and come back to it whenever i feel the vibe.

Is there a certain process or ritual you have before you get in your creative zone? What is your process (if you have one)? 

Well when i really became serious about making music, I would channel my negative feelings into the music I made. So now whenever I’m feeling some kind of way, instead of sitting in those feelings I will just start making music.

What kind of instruments, tools, equipment, programs, and inspiration do you use when making your music? 

For the most part, everything I do is digital, all the melodies, sampling, etc. all digital. I have made beats on a sp404sx and messed around on a Korg, but everything I have released has been completely digital. I think that I have gotten really good at achieving an analog sound digitally and anyone can do it as long as they keep at it. Some of my inspirations are artist like j^p^n, and Nujabes, they’ve been such a blessing in my life.

[…]
“The number one resource that I would give people are the lofi.hiphop forums, it has so much valuable information about everything from production tips and tricks to sample catalogs, drum kits, instruments, and much more, even if you’re looking for a friend to talk to chances are you can find someone on there. I’m really thankful to have had the opportunity to work with bsd.u with helping out on the forums. “

-Linanthem 2018

Would you ever think about having another interview with Loficulture?

Of course, I’d love to come back and talk again about anything really. It’s been a pleasure.

 

…”

END OF INTERVIEW

That’s all for this week’s guest interview 🙂
If you guys liked this week’s guest be sure to follow-up by showing some love on Linanthem’s social media and bump his tracks if you’re feeling that lo-fi vibe. Another thank you for Linanthem for joining the site, sharing his time, and thoughts on the entire genre. Follow him on the links below!

Linanthem Social Media 

Fanlink — Linanthem

Spotify — Linanthem

Bandcamp — Linanthem

Instagram — Linanthem

More Lo-fiCulture!

Thank you all for stopping by this week to catch up on your favorite lo-fi artists 🙂
Expect many more to come for the 2019 year! Be sure to stay in the loop by clicking the top left folder tab (top folder tab on mobile) and subscribing to our notification list in the side bar or by following us on our social media platforms below. Happy holidays everyone!!

Loficulture’s Twitter

Loficulture’s Instagram
*Note* 15% of  Lo-Fi Culture’s revenue provided by the amazon links above will be donated to GridAlternatives, a renewable energy charity focused on providing alternative energy for lower-income communities and more.

 

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